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Life on the road. This is reality. 

Text 21 Sep 2 notes Rolling With the P Hill Harmony

Angeline by samuelscott

So this track is by me, Phil Bostwick (or P Hill Harmony the rapping enigma) and Jol Mulholland - the idea was, I had to co-write, record and mix a hot track in an hour with Phil. Basically to give C4 some funny content and in turn, promote my record at the time Straight Answer Machine. Obviously it was a stupid idea (mine of course) and almost completely impossible. Despite Phil feeling that I perhaps was a bit bossy and he didn’t get to contribute as much as would have liked, I think the track turned out great and Phils rapping at the climax of the tune is the best part. 

It was a few years ago now, I should have put the track up on myspace or something then but never got around to it. If I could have spent another hour on it I would edit out some of my vocal grunts, but Jol is a fantastic engineer and somehow the sound of the thing is actually pretty bloody good. As for the songwriting well, I had an hour ok? What did you expect ‘Sad Eyed Lady of The Lowlands’ or some shit?

Text 16 Sep 2 notes Unused film score - sounds like Eno

Rewi’s Dream by samuelscott

Just signed up for Souncloud (a few years late I know). It seems a great forum for dumping pieces of music that you like but don’t know what to do with. Here is a piece I recently made for a museum installation, which came a little TOO ambient and little too Eno if I am honest.

I like though, it soothes my mind grapes.  

Photo 15 Sep 1 note Recently The Phoenix Foundation won the NZ Music Award for ‘best producer’. We have won this before (for Happy Ending) but they only put Lee’s name on it that time so it was pretty nice to have a Tui with the band name on it. Buffalo was the first record that we didn’t brand a co-production with Lee Prebble, he still worked his ass off on the record but essentially Luke Buda, Conrad Wedde and myself built the frame work of the album in our band hq before taking it to his studio so that he could polish it up. 
-

That’s all much of a muchness, but winning the award made me think about what the word ‘producer’ means, and wether that is actually what I do for a job. I am forever struggling to come up with a word to put under ‘occupation’ on immigration cards; composer? musician? lay about? I realise now that perhaps I am a producer and maybe I have been so for about 8 years. 
-

I think the role of the producer is like being a translator between the four main elements of recording- THE SONG, THE PERFORMANCE, THE ARRANGEMENT and THE RECORDING, then topping it off by making tea and keeping the vibe nice. I love this synergy and most recently took on this role producing Eva Prowse, if we go back to 2001 however, I was struggling to write songs that weren’t awful, my solo recordings were a shambles and I very much needed the help of the two guys that I still work with almost non stop (and it could be argued I still need their help). 
-
 'This Charming Van' was recorded just before Richie, Will and Tim joined the band, it was essentially the song that got the band back together about four months after TPF mark 1 fell apart. I played Luke the song, he mapped out a drum machine part. I played some bass, Luke played some slide. We threw some ‘found audio’ ’70s religious talk back radio in the back of the mix. Will came in, played some percussion (and in doing so joined the band!). Luke was building the arrangement piece by piece, he had the methodical approach that I wouldn’t fully grasp for awhile yet. The track was almost done but lacked something. Conrad wandered into the little studio* and was rather easily coerced into the fun, added a lovely piano line and the track was done. Luke gave the tune a bit of a mix, I made a swirly cover in photoshop, we burnt it to a couple of CDs and didn’t even think about mastering it. I found this CDR on the shelves at Radio Active the other day and my nostalgia gland exploded. This was a relic of great importance to the history of the band, a memento of the two days in which we went from not existing as a band anymore to suddenly making the sort of music we had been wanting to make, almost by accident. 
-
I still think it is a lovely sounding tune and its a fairly clear line in the sand; everything I did before this point was some sort of training, everything since (TPF or solo) has been real. Which is not to say that TPF didn’t have some good moments in our mk 1 guise, I loved playing with Tui and Noel - they are awesome musicians and great dudes. Nor do I think I doubt that I have had my share of failures since that point. Its just that from that point on I didn’t feel completely lost in the recording process. ‘This Charming Van’ would be followed by ‘The Drinker’ (which involved our first ratty attempts at tape transfer). ‘The Drinker’ was followed by working with Lee and from that point on a small group of people listened to our music. Hoorah!
-
I’m so grateful that I have had Luke to show me how synths work, Conrad to spark my interest in toy keyboards, Lee to make reverbs less mysterious and MORE mysterious at the same time. Over the years I have probably become the most techy nerd in the band, I don’t know how this happened but its too boring to write about. I love recording music, more so even than playing live. I think it is perhaps my job. I hope I don’t get fired!
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-
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*This studio was shared by myself, Conrad, Luke Buda, Luke Savage (who made the This Charming Van video on a budget of $200) Puck Murphy and Emlyn Hughes. This drafty old church on Frederic St was a wonderful place for us young fellows to learn how to record songs, make videos and build websites. Emlyn captured much of our activity on this flash tastic side WKDS. The WKDS was so ahead of its time that it won loads of web awards, got massive amounts of traffic (like half a million hits a month) and This Charming Van was downloaded from its flashy chambers over 50,000 over its first year. Wha!?

Recently The Phoenix Foundation won the NZ Music Award for ‘best producer’. We have won this before (for Happy Ending) but they only put Lee’s name on it that time so it was pretty nice to have a Tui with the band name on it. Buffalo was the first record that we didn’t brand a co-production with Lee Prebble, he still worked his ass off on the record but essentially Luke Buda, Conrad Wedde and myself built the frame work of the album in our band hq before taking it to his studio so that he could polish it up. 

-

That’s all much of a muchness, but winning the award made me think about what the word ‘producer’ means, and wether that is actually what I do for a job. I am forever struggling to come up with a word to put under ‘occupation’ on immigration cards; composer? musician? lay about? I realise now that perhaps I am a producer and maybe I have been so for about 8 years. 

-

I think the role of the producer is like being a translator between the four main elements of recording- THE SONG, THE PERFORMANCE, THE ARRANGEMENT and THE RECORDING, then topping it off by making tea and keeping the vibe nice. I love this synergy and most recently took on this role producing Eva Prowse, if we go back to 2001 however, I was struggling to write songs that weren’t awful, my solo recordings were a shambles and I very much needed the help of the two guys that I still work with almost non stop (and it could be argued I still need their help). 

-

 'This Charming Van' was recorded just before Richie, Will and Tim joined the band, it was essentially the song that got the band back together about four months after TPF mark 1 fell apart. I played Luke the song, he mapped out a drum machine part. I played some bass, Luke played some slide. We threw some ‘found audio’ ’70s religious talk back radio in the back of the mix. Will came in, played some percussion (and in doing so joined the band!). Luke was building the arrangement piece by piece, he had the methodical approach that I wouldn’t fully grasp for awhile yet. The track was almost done but lacked something. Conrad wandered into the little studio* and was rather easily coerced into the fun, added a lovely piano line and the track was done. Luke gave the tune a bit of a mix, I made a swirly cover in photoshop, we burnt it to a couple of CDs and didn’t even think about mastering it. I found this CDR on the shelves at Radio Active the other day and my nostalgia gland exploded. This was a relic of great importance to the history of the band, a memento of the two days in which we went from not existing as a band anymore to suddenly making the sort of music we had been wanting to make, almost by accident. 

-

I still think it is a lovely sounding tune and its a fairly clear line in the sand; everything I did before this point was some sort of training, everything since (TPF or solo) has been real. Which is not to say that TPF didn’t have some good moments in our mk 1 guise, I loved playing with Tui and Noel - they are awesome musicians and great dudes. Nor do I think I doubt that I have had my share of failures since that point. Its just that from that point on I didn’t feel completely lost in the recording process. ‘This Charming Van’ would be followed by ‘The Drinker’ (which involved our first ratty attempts at tape transfer). ‘The Drinker’ was followed by working with Lee and from that point on a small group of people listened to our music. Hoorah!

-

I’m so grateful that I have had Luke to show me how synths work, Conrad to spark my interest in toy keyboards, Lee to make reverbs less mysterious and MORE mysterious at the same time. Over the years I have probably become the most techy nerd in the band, I don’t know how this happened but its too boring to write about. I love recording music, more so even than playing live. I think it is perhaps my job. I hope I don’t get fired!

-

-

-

*This studio was shared by myself, Conrad, Luke Buda, Luke Savage (who made the This Charming Van video on a budget of $200) Puck Murphy and Emlyn Hughes. This drafty old church on Frederic St was a wonderful place for us young fellows to learn how to record songs, make videos and build websites. Emlyn captured much of our activity on this flash tastic side WKDS. The WKDS was so ahead of its time that it won loads of web awards, got massive amounts of traffic (like half a million hits a month) and This Charming Van was downloaded from its flashy chambers over 50,000 over its first year. Wha!?


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